Category Index
Books About Big Art
  • A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932
    A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932
    by John Richardson
  • Sarah Lucas: A Catalog RaisonnĂ©
    Sarah Lucas: A Catalog Raisonné
    by Yilmaz Dziewior, Sarah Lucas
  • Grayson Perry
    Grayson Perry
    by Jacky Klein
  • Hendrik Kerstens (English and Dutch Edition)
    Hendrik Kerstens (English and Dutch Edition)
    by Pim Milo, Kathy Ryan
  • David Hockney: A Bigger Picture
    David Hockney: A Bigger Picture
    by Marco Livingstone, Margaret Drabble, Tim Barringer, Xavier Salomon, Stuart Comer, Martin Gayford
  • Vernon Ah Kee: Born in this Skin
    Vernon Ah Kee: Born in this Skin
    by Robert Leonard, Anthony Gardner, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Blair French, Glenn Barkley
  • Yayoi Kusama
    Yayoi Kusama
    by Midori Yamamura, Jo Applin, Yayoi Kusama
  • Henry Moore: From the Inside Out; Plasters, Carvings, Drawings
    Henry Moore: From the Inside Out; Plasters, Carvings, Drawings
    Prestel Publishing
  • Wall and Piece
    Wall and Piece
    by Banksy
  • Mark Rothko
    Mark Rothko
    by Mr. Jeffrey Weiss
  • Louise Bourgeois
    Louise Bourgeois
    by Robert Storr, Paulo Herkenhoff
  • Damien Hirst
    Damien Hirst
    by Ann Gallagher
Join the Big Picture

A blog that aims to spark thoughts and inspire by seeking out and sharing works of art

Historically, artists have always worked big, and nowadays those boundaries are being pushed to the limits.

Large-scale art, whether in the form of photos from the Hubble space telescope, sharks floating in tanks of formaldehyde, rooms full of dots, concrete sculptures cast from Victorian buildings or hand knitted blankets wrapped around trees, large-scale art is all around us. Join the Big Picture aims to spark thoughts and inspire by seeking out and sharing these works.

All content by Karla Thompson, an ex-pat Aussie living in East London. When not working on Join the Big Picture she is part of the backbone to the Leonhard Pfeifer brand.

Read an interview about Join the Big Picture here.

 

Karla Thompson
Creative Partner

www.leonhardpfeifer.com
www.jointhebigpicture.com

 

 

 

Detail of Yarn Bombing UK

« Out an about on the streets | Main | Where the wild things grow »
Wednesday
Jun042014

Timo Nasseri - One and One #34

Timo Nasseri One and One #34, 2013
White in on silkscreened paper

Details of One and One #34

"Thinking about the meditative quality of repetition came when I started working on the Muqarnas series. I realised that the construction of these ornamental patterns follows certain rhythmical repetitions and the act of drawing them becomes a meditation. The drawings are a good example. They are very geometrical and very clear and I know where I have to go. One thing I have to explain about the drawings is that they're made from a combination of triangles; in fact it's only four different triangles, which are always repeating all the time and can carry on forever. The end of the drawing is only determined by the piece of paper. All of the One and One drawings could continue endlessly. This is why the lines don't go to the end of the paper and I'm leaving a bit of black, so it's clear there is the possibility for more. Aesthetics is very much linked to repetition. There is a mathematician called Scott Rickard who tried to compose the worst piece of music ever written by repeating nothing, neither the length of a note, nor a single note itself. He used all the 88 keys on the piano and by not repeating the length of a note, there was no rhythm left. Repetition is very important when it comes to a normal aesthetic. If you listen to a song without repetition, it would just sound very odd. Rhythm is itself repetition. Little changes, variations in this repetition, can make things interesting."

Taken in part from an interview with Timo Nasseri from http://www.ibraaz.org/interviews/38

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