Category Index
Books About Big Art
  • A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932
    A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932
    by John Richardson
  • Sarah Lucas: A Catalog RaisonnĂ©
    Sarah Lucas: A Catalog Raisonné
    by Yilmaz Dziewior, Sarah Lucas
  • Grayson Perry
    Grayson Perry
    by Jacky Klein
  • Hendrik Kerstens (English and Dutch Edition)
    Hendrik Kerstens (English and Dutch Edition)
    by Pim Milo, Kathy Ryan
  • David Hockney: A Bigger Picture
    David Hockney: A Bigger Picture
    by Marco Livingstone, Margaret Drabble, Tim Barringer, Xavier Salomon, Stuart Comer, Martin Gayford
  • Vernon Ah Kee: Born in this Skin
    Vernon Ah Kee: Born in this Skin
    by Robert Leonard, Anthony Gardner, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Blair French, Glenn Barkley
  • Yayoi Kusama
    Yayoi Kusama
    by Midori Yamamura, Jo Applin, Yayoi Kusama
  • Henry Moore: From the Inside Out; Plasters, Carvings, Drawings
    Henry Moore: From the Inside Out; Plasters, Carvings, Drawings
    Prestel Publishing
  • Wall and Piece
    Wall and Piece
    by Banksy
  • Mark Rothko
    Mark Rothko
    by Mr. Jeffrey Weiss
  • Louise Bourgeois
    Louise Bourgeois
    by Robert Storr, Paulo Herkenhoff
  • Damien Hirst
    Damien Hirst
    by Ann Gallagher
Join the Big Picture

A blog that aims to spark thoughts and inspire by seeking out and sharing works of art

Historically, artists have always worked big, and nowadays those boundaries are being pushed to the limits.

Large-scale art, whether in the form of photos from the Hubble space telescope, sharks floating in tanks of formaldehyde, rooms full of dots, concrete sculptures cast from Victorian buildings or hand knitted blankets wrapped around trees, large-scale art is all around us. Join the Big Picture aims to spark thoughts and inspire by seeking out and sharing these works.

All content by Karla Thompson, an ex-pat Aussie living in East London. When not working on Join the Big Picture she is part of the backbone to the Leonhard Pfeifer brand.

Read an interview about Join the Big Picture here.

 

Karla Thompson
Creative Partner

www.leonhardpfeifer.com
www.jointhebigpicture.com

 

 

 

Detail of Yarn Bombing UK

Entries in Antwerp (2)

Sunday
Sep162012

Peter Paul Rubens

Antwerp is such a beautiful city. It has a spectacular train station, a new town full of open air restaurants and a wonderful old town that is just run down enough to suit my tastes; full of art galleries, independent design shops and cafes, as well as walled churches full to the brim with paintings by Peter Paul Rubens.  

“The city owes its life to the Schelde River, and its soul to Rubens. More than 400 years after the birth of this brilliant painter, it is still possible to see the extent to which Rubens left his mark on the city.”

Whilst meandering through the old town with my family, we stumbled upon a small door leading into St Paul’s Church. Greeted by possibly the oldest (and sweetest) lady in the world, we were invited to view, for free, an extensive collection of 17th Century Flemish masters including Rubens.

Hanging impressively on of the church walls is Peter Paul Rubens Dispute of the holy sacrament, painted around 1609.

The colour and richness of the painting is enormous, as is its size, but for me, seeing such a work in context is what makes the experience so memorable. The church was full with quiet noise; the excited whispering of tourists seeing the interior for the first time, the shuffle of volunteer workers in their cardigans offering chocolate to small 4 year olds visiting with family, locals dropping in for a quite religious moment as well as a choir from Slovenia rehearsing for their performance that evening of 16th Century medieval music. All wonderfully gentile noises suited to viewing such great works of art.

Inside St Paul's Church, Antwerp

Peter Paul Rubens Dispute of the holy sacrament, insitu.

Saturday
Sep082012

Hendrik Kerstens

Aluminium by Hendrik Kerstens © the artist
Courtesy of Nunc-Contemporary

Bag by Hendrik Kerstens, 2007 © the artist
Courtesy of Nunc-Contemporary

Second prize winner of the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, 2008, National Portrait Gallery, London

Spout by Hendrik Kerstens © the artist
Courtesy of Nunc-Contemporary

Last week whilst enjoying the good weather in Antwerpen my family and I were walking down a delightful street in old town when I was entranced by the most intense portrait staring out at me from an art gallery window.

After talking with the owner of Nunc-Contemporary gallery I discovered that the portraits where by a Dutch photographic Hendrik Kersten, who has been photographing his daughter Paula since 1995.

His larger than life, award winning portraits are reminiscent of Vermeer’s paintings. The austerity and clarity of the photographs, coupled with the serenity of the subject and the characteristic ‘dutch’ light all combine to create striking, beautiful and haunting works of art. Though, as the titles of the pieces suggest, with a humorous twist on the past to the present.

For more information on the above images please contact Dirk at Nunc-Contemporary.