Category Index
Books About Big Art
  • A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932
    A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932
    by John Richardson
  • Sarah Lucas: A Catalog Raisonné
    Sarah Lucas: A Catalog Raisonné
    by Yilmaz Dziewior, Sarah Lucas
  • Grayson Perry
    Grayson Perry
    by Jacky Klein
  • Hendrik Kerstens (English and Dutch Edition)
    Hendrik Kerstens (English and Dutch Edition)
    by Pim Milo, Kathy Ryan
  • David Hockney: A Bigger Picture
    David Hockney: A Bigger Picture
    by Marco Livingstone, Margaret Drabble, Tim Barringer, Xavier Salomon, Stuart Comer, Martin Gayford
  • Vernon Ah Kee: Born in this Skin
    Vernon Ah Kee: Born in this Skin
    by Robert Leonard, Anthony Gardner, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Blair French, Glenn Barkley
  • Yayoi Kusama
    Yayoi Kusama
    by Midori Yamamura, Jo Applin, Yayoi Kusama
  • Henry Moore: From the Inside Out; Plasters, Carvings, Drawings
    Henry Moore: From the Inside Out; Plasters, Carvings, Drawings
    Prestel Publishing
  • Wall and Piece
    Wall and Piece
    by Banksy
  • Mark Rothko
    Mark Rothko
    by Mr. Jeffrey Weiss
  • Louise Bourgeois
    Louise Bourgeois
    by Robert Storr, Paulo Herkenhoff
  • Damien Hirst
    Damien Hirst
    by Ann Gallagher
Join the Big Picture

A blog that aims to spark thoughts and inspire by seeking out and sharing works of art

Historically, artists have always worked big, and nowadays those boundaries are being pushed to the limits.

Large-scale art, whether in the form of photos from the Hubble space telescope, sharks floating in tanks of formaldehyde, rooms full of dots, concrete sculptures cast from Victorian buildings or hand knitted blankets wrapped around trees, large-scale art is all around us. Join the Big Picture aims to spark thoughts and inspire by seeking out and sharing these works.

All content by Karla Thompson, an ex-pat Aussie living in East London. When not working on Join the Big Picture she is part of the backbone to the Leonhard Pfeifer brand.

Read an interview about Join the Big Picture here.

 

Karla Thompson
Creative Partner

www.leonhardpfeifer.com
www.jointhebigpicture.com

 

 

 

Detail of Yarn Bombing UK

Entries in New Plymouth (2)

Friday
Dec302011

Te Kupenga

Continuing our walk along the boardwalk in New Plymouth, New Zealand we chanced upon the biennial Te Kupenga International Stone Sculpture Symposium. The group "Te Kupenga" (meaning “The Net” in Māori), was set up initially to encourage stone carving using the local hard stone - Taranaki andesite.

Now in its 6th year, the Symposium featured 20+ artists from New Zealand and internationally, happily working away on the beach front, rain, hail or shine. And given the week we were enjoying during our visit in New Plymouth, it was more like heavy rain with wind and then more rain. Ekk!

An artist at work in the inclement weather...

Gheorghe Zaharia working on his piece. As we were only visiting for the week, we were unable to view the final pieces. However, you can see photos of Gheorghe's finished work here.

A fine example of the hard stone Taranaki Andesite. "The andesite is obtained as large river-worn boulders, and is the predominant stone found in all the rivers and streams draining the Taranaki Peninsula as well as along the coastline.

Taranaki Andesite is derived from Mt Taranaki, the 2518m high volcano that overlooks the province and is an iconic and much revered part of the Taranaki landscape. Mt Taranaki is a classic andesite stratovolcano having a steep conical form made up of layers andesite lava and volcanic debris, resting on an extensive ring plain of volcanic material." As quoted from "The Stone - Taranaki Andesite".

Jonathon Mencarelli's working spot

Jonathon Mencarelli's work-in-progress. As we were only visiting for the week, we were unable to view the final pieces. However, you can see the finished work for Jonathon here.

Thursday
Dec292011

Len Lye Wind Wand 

Our walk along the coastal board walk today saw us pass by a dramatic artwork on the city’s foreshore. Len Lye’s kinetic sculpture 'Wind Wand' is spectacularly noisy, waving and howling away in today’s strong wind on the ocean front as well as one of the biggest art pieces visible in the city.

Backed by the Tasman Sea and based on a pathway of the New Zealand city of New Plymouth's coastal walk, the 45 meter red wind wand is breathtaking. If not a little scary when standing underneath it with strong winds and a 3 year old hanging onto your skirt for fear of being blown away.

I knew little (i.e.: nothing) about Len Lye until I walked passed his kinetic sculpture today. Born in 1901, he has made New Zealanders very proud. Working in London and New York before his death in 1980 he is best know as a film-maker and kinetic sculpture.

More of his work can be seen at Govett Brewster Art Gallery .I quite like his 'Motion Sketch' drawing.

 

29.12.2011

Len Lye Wind Wand

New Plymouth, New Zealand.

 

Our walk along the coastal board walk today saw us pass by a dramatic artwork on the city’s foreshore. Len Lye’s kinetic sculpture “Wind Wand” is spectacularly noisy, waving and howling away in today’s strong wind on the ocean front as well as one of the biggest art pieces visible in the city.

 

Backed by the Tasman Sea and based on a pathway of the city’s coastal walk, the 45 meter red wind wand is breathtaking. If not a little scary when standing underneath it with strong winds and a 3 year old hanging onto your skirt for fear of being blown away.

 

I knew little (i.e.: nothing) about Len Lye until I walked passed his kinetic sculpture today. Born in 1901, he has made New Zealanders very proud. Working in London and New York before his death in 1980 he is best know as a film-maker and kinetic sculpture.

 

http://www.govettbrewster.com/LenLye/About/AboutLenLye.aspx

 

I quite like his Motion Sketch drawing. It makes me think of wind blowing hale bales. What do you think?

http://www.govettbrewster.com/LenLye/Work/GraphicWorks.aspx